Are we ready for the holiday season?

Remember seeing this in late 2019 early this year and thinking, “Wow, 2020 is going to be a GREAT year for the holidays!’? Well, that came to a SCREECHING halt!

Now, our thoughts about the holidays are, “Should we have a gathering like we had so many years in the past?” Most parents right now are contemplating whether they should let their children take part in trick-or-treat festivities this weekend. I have heard parents’ opinions on both sides of the topic, some believe that kids have given up so much this year already, and plan to participate in neighborhood trick-or-treat, while others believe the risk is just too high right now. Of course, there are also parents that are indifferent and choosing to participate in functions that they deem safer than others, but still letting there be some fun! However, there are some townships and boroughs that have cancelled the trick-or-treat across the country. A lot of local schools and churches are hosting “trunk-or-treat” events in their parking lots. These types of functions have become extremely popular over the last few years where you gather in a parking lot, decorate your trunk, and pass out candy. Most years, it is done in conjunction with neighborhood activities. This year, most likely, the schools will have to practice social distancing and park cars six feet apart, wearing gloves to pass out candy, and a mask will be mandatory (in addition to costume masks).

So, what is considered safe? On the CDC website, you can find a list of low, moderate and high-risk activities for Halloween and other upcoming holidays with family and friends. Some examples include the following:

Lower Risk Activities

  • Carving or decorating pumpkins outside, at a safe distance, with neighbors or friends
  • Having a virtual Halloween costume contest
  • Having a Halloween movie night with people you live with

Moderate Risk Activities

  • Participating in one-way trick-or-treating where individually wrapped goodie bags are lined up to grab
  • Having a small group, outdoor, open-air costume parade where people are distanced more than 6 feet apart
  • Visiting pumpkin patches or orchards where people use hand sanitizer before touching pumpkins or apple, wearing masks are encouraged or enforced and maintaining social distance

Higher Risk Activities

  • Participating in traditional trick-or-treating where treats are handed to children
  • Attending crowded costume parties held indoors
  • Going to an indoor haunted house where people may be crowded together and screaming

Then comes what feels like the busiest time of the year for a lot of people. Between holiday gatherings, preparations and shopping, sometimes it feels like we never have a break. While some may be cutting back on those events this year altogether, or on a smaller scale; others will be celebrating the holiday season as normal.

Again, the CDC has a list of what is safer, moderately safe, and less safe on their website. Though the website lists these activities for Thanksgiving, assuming they would be relatively close for Christmas/Hanukah and New Year’s festivities.   Examples include the following:

Lower Risk Activities

  • Having a smaller dinner with only people who live in your household
  • Shopping online rather than in person on Thanksgiving and Black Friday

Moderate Risk Activities

  • Having a small outdoor dinner with family and friends
  • Outdoor activities including pumpkin patches and orchard – add Tree Farms to this list

Higher Risk Activities

  • Attending crowded parties or attending large indoor gatherings
  • Going shopping in crowded stores just before, on, or after Thanksgiving and the day after Christmas (Boxing Day)

Whether you are looking forward to the holidays as normal, or cutting back on festivities, as always, consider the safe choice for you. It is still such a joyous time of the year with family and friends. It doesn’t matter if you choose in-person or virtual events, just choose to surround yourself with love and laughter this holiday season… we all need it. Stay safe and healthy.

https://www.cdc.gov/coronavirus/2019-ncov/daily-life-coping/holidays/halloween.html

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As Director of Marketing for Guttman Energy, I provide expertise within advertising strategies, digital marketing, and public relations to communicate our key messaging to our stakeholders. I offer diversified leadership, drive innovation and cutting-edge business, branding, to generate interest in Guttman service offerings.

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