Oil Industry Fighting Back

Plans to build charging stations across the country are being crushed by groups backed by industry giants like Exxon Mobil and Koch Empire. According to utility commission filings, these groups have challenged electric companies’ across the United States. Electric utilities are seeking approval on building charging networks in locations such as shopping centers and rest stops across the nation. Whereas the petroleum sector, represented by multiple trade associations and industry-funded political groups, and consumer advocates say they should not have to pay for these services. Stating, their customers will have to pay for the investments helping utilities “pad” their balance sheets. Fossil fuel interests control about 90 percent of the transportation fuel market in the U.S. but are feeling more and more pressure from the electric wave.

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BP Exits Alaska

British Petroleum (BP) announced this week that they are selling their Alaska operations to Hilcorp Energy Co. for $5.6 billion dollars, ending their six-decade existence in “The Land of the Midnight Sun.”  The sale to Hilcorp Energy Co includes BP’s stake in the Prudhoe Bay oil field, the Point Thomson gas field and the Trans-Alaska Pipeline.  The deal makes Hilcorp Energy Co. the second largest Alaska producer, between leader ConocoPhillips and ExxonMobil.  The proposed deal is subject to state and federal regulatory approval but the deal is expected to be finalized in 2020, according to BP.

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U.S. Continues Torrent Production Growth

In 2018, the United States petroleum production increased 16% while simultaneously increasing natural gas production by 12%.  According to the Energy Information Administration (EIA), “these totals combined established a new production record.”  The United States has been the largest producer of natural gas since it passed Russia in 2011, and last year the U.S. surpassed Saudi Arabia to become the largest producer of petroleum.  All signs indicate that the U.S. will continue to expand their production prominence, and over the next decade, the U.S. is set to account for 61% of all new global oil and gas production, nearly nine times the amount of Canada who projects to be second on the production increase list. 

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Stackin’ Equipment in Exchange For Returns on Wall Street

Halliburton Co. announced this week that it has cut eight percent of its North American workforce as a response to a slump in demand for hydraulic fracturing and have removed unused fracking equipment in the United States and Canada.  The Houston-based contractor and world’s biggest provider of fracking equipment made the decision to downsize personnel after its revenue fell thirteen percent in the second quarter of this year.  Halliburton has 60,000 employees worldwide and although an official number of jobs to be cut was not announced, it will most definitely affect their employees in the natural gas shale field.

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Enriched Tensions

According to reports, Iran is quickly going to breach the Uranium-stockpile limit set by the current nuclear deal.  President Hassan Rouhani of Iran has already warned that a new deal needed to be in action by Sunday June 7, 2019 or the Islamic Republic will increase enrichment of Uranium.  Globally, there is much concern with the growth rate of Iran’s uranium cache, because they are just a step away from weapon-grade levels of uranium.

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Early Morning Explosion

Early Friday morning, a massive explosion occurred in south Philadelphia at the Philadelphia Energy Solutions Refining Complex. The 150-year-old oil refinery, opened in 1866 just after the Civil War, had a vat of butane ignite and explode causing Interstates 76 and 95 to close and even “rattled” homes in the South Jersey area.

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Trump’s Tweet Tilts Markets

It has been a wild Monday for traders after President Trump tweeted yesterday that the United States will increase tariffs on $200 billion of Chinese imports, which, is casting doubt on the likelihood of a successful U.S. and Chinese trade deal.

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“Oil Buyers Club”

China and India have had considered on creating a “club” which will negotiate better prices with oil exporting countries and will be looking to import more U.S. crude oil in order to reduce OPEC’s sway. Two of the world’s largest oil importers, second and third respectfully, have exchanged senior level visits several times to discuss the premiums placed on oil sold to Asian nations. India, which imports more than 80% of its oil requirements, has seen oil prices increase to more than $75 a barrel.

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